Music

We believe that children gain a firm understanding of what music is through listening, singing, playing, evaluating, analysing, and composing across a wide variety of historical periods, styles, traditions, and musical genres.

Our aim is to develop a curiosity for the subject, as well as an understanding and acceptance of the validity and importance of all types of music, and an unbiased respect for the role that music may wish to be expressed. We are committed to ensuring children understand the value and importance of music in the wider community, and are able to use their musical skills, knowledge, and experiences to involve themselves in music, in a variety of different contexts.

Intent

At William Stockton and Wimboldsley, we believe a high-quality music education should engage and inspire pupils. As pupils progress, they should develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose and to listen to a large range of music. 

The intent of our music curriculum is to promote curiosity and a love of learning. It is ambitious and empowers children to become independent and resilient when performing, listening, composing and understanding the history of music. We follow the statutory requirements of the National Curriculum for Key Stage One and Key Stage Two.  We enhance our curriculum with composer of the month.  This encourages the children to listen to and appraise a wide range of music and develops their understanding of the history of music throughout the school. 

Interconnected curriculum links are impertinent to our music curriculum.  Where the links are made, this encourages the children to build strong and meaningful schema which helps them to recall and retrieve what they have learnt. 

As a result of our planned music curriculum, children are able to: 

  • perform, listen to, review and evaluate music
  • be taught to sing, create and compose music
  • understand and explore how music is created, produced and communicated
  • gain a firm understanding of what music is through listening, singing, playing, evaluating, analysing, and composing across a wide variety of historical periods, styles, traditions, and musical genres.
  •  developing a curiosity for the subject
  • ensure children understand the value and importance of music in the wider community 
  • use their musical skills, knowledge, and experiences to involve themselves in music, in a variety of different contexts.
  • link music and musical experiences to the wider school curriculum

Implementation

The music curriculum ensures children sing, listen, play, perform and evaluate. This is embedded in the classroom through: the structured music programme  with Little Voices; through composer of the month where music is appraised and discussed along with the composer; and through weekly singing assemblies.  

Children are encouraged to not only listen to music but build up the capacity to be able to enjoy different types of music and link this to their lives. 

The elements of music are taught in the classroom lessons so that children are able to use some of the language of music to dissect it, and understand how it is made, played, appreciated and analysed. In the classroom, children learn key aspects of music through cross-curricular links. They also learn how to compose, focusing on different dimensions of music, which in turn feeds their understanding when listening, playing, or analysing music. 

Composing or performing using body percussion and vocal sounds is also part of the curriculum, which develops the understanding of musical elements without the added complexity of an instrument.

Impact

Whilst in school, children have access to a varied programme, which allows them to discover areas of strength, as well as areas they might like to improve upon. The integral nature of music and the learner creates an enormously rich palette from which a child may access fundamental abilities such as: achievement, self-confidence, interaction with and awareness of others, and self-reflection. 

Music will also develop an understanding of culture and history, both in relation to children individually, as well as ethnicities from across the world. Children are able to enjoy music in as many ways as they choose – either as listener, creator or performer. They can dissect music and comprehend its parts. They can sing and feel a pulse. They have an understanding of how to further develop skills less known to them, should they ever develop an interest in their lives.

Mastery in music comes over time and as a result of children retrieving and repeating skills to ensure that with repeated practice and retrieval the knowledge and skills are stored in their long term memory.  

Comparative judgements are made with pupils to assess their knowledge and the impact of the music curriculum.  This compares what the children could do to what they can do now.  

The school monitoring system of, Precision Teach, ensures that the music curriculum is evaluated and that any actions inform the next steps on the subject leader action plan. 

 

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William Stockton Primary School

Heathfield Road, Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, CH65 8DH

0151 3551650

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